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  Bardia National Park

Brief
The Royal Bardia National Park was initially a Royal hunting reserve. It was in 1976 that it was gazetted as Royal Karnali Wildlife Reserve with an area of only 368 sq. KM in 1982, It was renamed as Royal Bardia Wildlife Reserve Which also included the Babai River Valley. It was only in 1988 that is was granted a status of National Park in order to preserve the dwindling species of rare ecosystem, including flora and fauna, particularly the tiger and its other prey species. This park is the largest and most undisturbed wilderness area in the terai p[providing excellent habitat for most of the endangered species of wildlife and birds. The park now covers an area of 968 sq. KM. It was only 1994 basic facilities existed for independent visitors.

Reasons to visit
We welcome you to the most exciting tourist attractions and travel destinations which are given below. We take into notice each and every details about recreation, entertainment, adventure and relaxation. By looking at the things to do in a city one can see if that spot offers romance, family fun, sightseeing or adventure. Drill down into the tourist attractions below to find out more about each place and see how the local customs create a unique atmosphere.
 
Natural Beauty  
Today's Royal Bardia National Park is bordered to the south by the Babai River, to the north by the Shiwalik or Churia Hills, to the west by the Girwa River (a tributary of the Karnali), and to the east by a section of the East-West Highway which bisects the park. The Terai is only in the southwest corner of the park. Much of Bardia is on the southern slopes of the Shiwalik Range where the hills rise to over 4,000 feet. From the base of these hills, the park slopes gently over highly porous ground for several miles to the rivers of the Gangetic plain. At Chisopani Gorge, the swift-flowing Karnali River emerges from the Shiwalik Range onto the broad plain and flows purposefully through the semi-tropical jungle. Where the river braids out, small riverine forested islands form. Wildlife frequent these oases - maybe you'll be as lucky as we once were to spot a wild Elephant swimming trunk-deep across the river to reach the island.

Fuana  
What makes a visit to Nepal's Royal Bardia National Park particularly special is not just its large and intact habitat area and its isolated location, but also the presence here of one of the last known herds of wild Elephants in South Asia. The herd, numbering less than two dozen, roams these remote jungles in western Nepal. The largest of the herd is affectionately called “Thulo Hati”, which means "Big Elephant" in the Nepali language. Seeing these wild Elephants greyish-white bulk rising above the morning mists and hearing them trumpet across the jungle clearing is one of the most remarkable wildlife experiences to be had on our planet. Bardia also boasts the greatest number of deer species in Nepal. Other large mammals are Gaur, the largest wild oxen in world; wild Boar, an omnivorous black-coated creature with large tusks; the agile sloth Bear, a shaggy black bear with a distinctive white "V" on its chest; Blue Bull or Nilgai, the largest Antelope on the Indian subcontinent; and Himalayan Tahr. Serow and Goral, two goat-Antelope members, are also found. Small mammals include: Langur Monkey, Rhesus Macaque, Jackal, three species of cats (jungle, leopard, and fishing); yellow-throated Marten; Mongoose; and Indian Otter. Two species of crocodiles swim in the Karnali, Girwa, and Babai Rivers - the blunt-snouted Marsh Mugger and the fish-eating gharial with its long thin snout. Birds are the park's most conspicuous fauna with over 300 resident and migratory species. Avid bird-watchers will want to visit the park in November or from February to April when migrants arrive, depart or pass through.

Jungle Safari 
To view the wild Elephants, you ride on the backs of specially-trained elephants, each guided by a driver. As you sit in a padded wooden platform on the Elephant's back with your camera ready, your Mahout steers the Elephant through tall grass. Mists rise off the nearby river, and you spot a mother Rhino leading her baby down to the river for a drink. Monkeys chatter and birds call in the nearby trees, signaling that an elusive Royal Bengal Tiger is stalking Deer through the high grass. It's a very special experience - a unique experience out at Royal Bardia - unlike any other wildlife setting in Nepal.